Douglas Kriner

Douglas Kriner
Douglas Kriner is an associate professor of political science and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. His research interests include American political institutions, separation of powers dynamics, and American military policymaking. Professor Kriner graduated Phi Beta Kappa from MIT in 2001 and received his Ph.D. in Government from Harvard University in 2006. His first book (with Francis Shen), The Casualty Gap: The Causes and Consequences of American Military Policymaking, documents the emergence, beginning in the Korean War, of socioeconomic inequalities in who bears the human costs of war. It then traces the ramifications of these inequalities for politics and policy-making. His second book, After the Rubicon: Congress, Presidents, and the Politics of Waging War, investigates the mechanisms through which Congress shapes the initiation, conduct and duration of major American military actions, even when it fails to write its policy preferences into law. Professor Kriner’s work has also appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and British Journal of Political Science, among other outlets. Professor Kriner’s teaching interests include courses on the presidency, Congress, domestic politics and the use of force, separation of powers, and quantitative methods.

The Particularistic President: Executive Branch Politics and Political Inequality.

In the United States presidential elections are big business.  More than fifteen months before the general election, candidates and their affiliated super-PACs have already raised almost $130 million.  They will raise and spend many hundreds of millions more before the last ballot is counted.  The vast majority of those dollars ...

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